Small Satellites and the Global Environment [05/28/2017]

Guests:

  • Dr. Joseph N. Pelton, Professor/Dean (Ret.), International Space University and Executive Board Member, International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), (In-Studio)*
  • Dr. Scott Madry, Director, Global Space Institute and Professor, University of North Carolina, (By Skype)*
  • Dr. Peter Martinez, Director of ‘Space Lab’, University of Cape Town, South Africa, (Former) Chairman, Space Council of South Africa, and Chairman, United Nations Working Group on the Long Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities, (By Skype)*
  • Panel Discussion with Dr. Joseph N. Pelton, Professor/Dean (Ret.), International Space University and Executive Board Member, International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), (In-Studio)*; Dr. Scott Madry, Director, Global Space Institute and Professor, University of North Carolina, (By Skype)*; Dr. Peter Martinez, Director of ‘Space Lab’, University of Cape Town, South Africa, (Former) Chairman, Space Council of South Africa, and Chairman, United Nations Working Group on the Long Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities, (By Skype)*

Show 1Screen Shot 2017-06-06 at 9.02.36 AM

Dr. Joseph N. Pelton, Professor/Dean (Ret.), International Space University and Executive Board Member, International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), (In-Studio)*

Show 2Screen Shot 2017-06-06 at 9.03.58 AM

Dr. Scott Madry, Director, Global Space Institute and Professor, University of North Carolina, (By Skype)*

Show 3Screen Shot 2017-06-06 at 9.04.41 AM

Dr. Peter Martinez, Director of ‘Space Lab’, University of Cape Town, South Africa, (Former) Chairman, Space Council of South Africa, and Chairman, United Nations Working Group on the Long Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities, (By Skype)*

Show 4Screen Shot 2017-06-06 at 9.08.55 AM

Panel Discussion with Dr. Joseph N. Pelton (In-Studio)*, Dr. Scott Madry (By Skype)*, and Dr. Peter Martinez (By Skype)*


Program Summary:

The EmeraldPlanet weekly television programs are broadcast and distributed via Channel 10 TV in Fairfax, Virginia USA. The EmeraldPlanet TV programs are available to view on our website, YouTube, UStream TV, and social media around the world. The Emerald Trek and companion The Emerald Mini-Treks are identifying the 1,000 “best practices” on location from the 143 nations, 750 cities, and 50,000 communities by Internet TV, local television stations, main stream media outlets, YouTube, Facebook, The EmeraldPlanet Meetup, Twitter, among other social media networks, and all manner of print media.

The EmeraldPlanet TV is broadcasting weekly a number of the “best practices which are identified through collaboration with:  major non-governmental organizations (NGOs); United Nations, universities and colleges; research institutes; government ministries and agencies; Embassies; banking and micro-lending organizations; Chambers of Commerce; World Trade Centers, international bodies such as The World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Inter-American Development Bank, African Development Bank Group, Asian Development Bank, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization), citizens groups; multimedia organizations; among others by utilizing the most advanced broadcasting hardware and software along with an outstanding television Production Crew to reach an ever expanding global audience. The Emerald Trek is focused upon linking principals identified among the 1,000 ‘best practices’ in the 143 nations being visited through this world-wide movement. The Emerald Trek is encompassing over 300,000 miles, visiting 750 major cities, and 50,000 suburban and rural communities in the identified nations.

Our featured guests are:

  • Show ‘1’: Dr. Joseph N. Pelton, Professor/Dean (Ret.), International Space University and Executive Board Member, International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), (In-Studio)*
  • Show ‘2’: Dr. Scott Madry, Director, Global Space Institute and Professor, University of North Carolina, (By Skype)*
  • Show ‘3’: Dr. Peter Martinez, Director of ‘Space Lab’, University of Cape Town, South Africa, (Former) Chairman, Space Council of South Africa, and Chairman, United Nations Working Group on the Long Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities, (By Skype)*
  • Show ‘4’: Panel Discussion with Dr. Joseph N. Pelton (In-Studio)*, Dr. Scott Madry (By Skype)*, and Dr. Peter Martinez (By Skype)*

Program Overview:

We are featuring three of the world’s top researchers, authors, professors, policy experts, and consultants on the outer realms of space exploration.  In the last few years the world has experienced space entrepreneurs developing new low cost satellite rocket launchers and new small satellites, ranging from so-called “cube” satellites that are 10 cm by 10 cm by 10 cm (4 inches x 4 inches x 4 inches) in size—sort of like a square baseball on up to larger type small satellites that are providing amazing opportunities for research, real-time monitoring, observations, communications, and other benefits for the Africa continent, South and Central America countries, SIDS (Small Island Developing States) in the South Pacific, and many regions of Asia.  Nations across these broad expansions of land and space are discovering such small satellites can support the creation of needed “best practices” for helping humanity save our Emerald Planet and indeed humanity itself.

Our world renowned experts will discuss how these new satellites have been performing amazing services to study the environment and pollution.  At the same time such research, real-time monitoring of weather events, climate change, and environmental conditions are helping with farming, discovering crop and tree diseases, moisture content of  soils, nutrient levels in soils, erosion patters, while bringing Internet and cell telephone services to under-served parts of the world to provide such life changing opportunities as tele-education, tele-health, and international supply chain services, among hundreds of other critical needs. Such services were never affordably available in the more remote parts of the world, and often not available at all.  Such satellites are advancing the United Nations Sustainable Development 17 Goals for 2030 while helping to protect the environment, and much more.

Satellite systems have been used for remote education and health care for over forty [40] years, reports Dr. Joseph N. Pelton, Professor/Dean (Ret.), International Space University and Executive Board Member, International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS).  In 1986 the global satellite system known as INTELSAT (International Telecommunications Satellite Organization) created a project called “Project SHARE” lead by Dr. Pelton, who headed strategic policy and planning at INTELSAT.  SHARE was the acronym for “Satellite Health and Rural Education” (SHARE). The project started in 1986 with 37 remote stations and expanded all over rural China. China has evolved using its own satellites and there are now over 90,000 very small aperture terminals and over 10 million students in its modern system. Indian has the SITE project that provides health and rural education to millions of students as well.  These systems were created by conventional large scale satellites. New small satellite constellations can bring services much closer to the village and county level at much lower cost and fully Internet based.  There are numerous other examples of how such small satellites and CUBESATs are being deployed and used around the globe.

Such satellites are quite small. A one [1] unit cube satellite is the size of a square baseball or a Rubik’s cube, but increasingly capable. There are concentrated miniaturized sophisticated electronics inside each unit   Many have superior optical sensors which are increasingly small, yet capable. Many innovative young people who build such units are using “off the shelf” electronics allowing for these to be built faster at much lower costs. These very small units can “see’ or “observe” the oceans, farming areas, trees and pastures, wild fires, crop diseases, both land and sea pollution, along with many other purposes with good accuracy.  These can also be connected in constellations of over a hundred or more of these small satellites which can survey the earth with great frequency.

Dr. Scott Madry is the Chief Executive Officer of The Global Space Institute (GSI) and a full Professor at the University of North Carolina.  Dr. Madry travels the world training people to use satellites for smart farming, crop disease detection, monitor climate change, and using images after disasters to aid rescue operations along with long-term planning for and delivery of disaster relief.  Such satellites from the United States, Japan, India, China, Russia, countries of the European Union, Australia, South Africa, among others to understand how much infrastructure, natural surroundings, and environmental damage is being done and where.  Such satellites can be used to observe which roads, airports, and sea ports are passable and open for relief deliveries.

There is an international Convention supports providing images of affected areas for free now used scores of times. There are volunteers around the world supporting emergency analysis of remote sensing data to provide rapid analysis when earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, typhoons, or tsunamis bring devastation. Dr. Madry is providing training to relief workers on how to utilize satellite remote sensing and communications.  Relief workers can easily understand where to concentrate their efforts and match the appropriate people with the types of support needed—clothing, medical supplies, tents, blankets, food, water supplies, sanitation, and where it should be delivered.

Dr. Peter Martinez is the:  Director of ‘Space Lab’ at the University of Cape Town, South Africa; (Former) Chairman, Space Council of South Africa; Chairman, Working Group, “Long Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities”; and Committee Member, “United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space”.  He is involved in an active working role in tracking space debris. It is reported there are about 22,000 significant space debris elements—old satellites, upper stage rockets, fragments from satellite collisions, among other space “junk”.  There are concerns collisions between big debris elements every five to ten [5 – 10] years will produce more debris.

The United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) and the InterAgency Space Debris Committee that works with the U.N. Committee have developed voluntary guidelines which can reduce debris. There are numerous experts in multiple countries researching ways to create active debris removal to help reduce this problem. There are some computer model graphics showing the buildup of debris in all the various orbits. The debris in low earth orbit and over the earth’s north and south poles represents the most serious problem because these orbits are so heavily used.

There are over eighty [80] countries represented through the COPUOS which are leading the efforts to reach an agreement on space regulations through the “Global Space Governance”. These include all of the major space faring nations, along with more developing countries using space for communications, remote sensing, weather forecasting, and climate change monitoring, space navigation, precise timing, and major scientific research purposes. This Working Group is facing many issues including space debris, solar storms, and new ways to use space for development and education.  At the same time the group is working to avoid creating problems for the safe and sustainable use of space for the long term.

Dr. Martinez reports such issues and agreements are difficult with so many different nations, needs, political realities, natural resources, national development stages, and expanding harsh and immediate climate change impacts.  This Group has “Meetings of the Whole”, Subcommittee on Law, a Technical Subcommittee, along with various specialized Working Groups. Steady progress is being focused upon evolving agreements of best practices and voluntary guidelines based upon an evolving consensus process.  The United Nations Committee for the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Outer Space Treaty along with four [4] supporting conventions and agreements reached some 40 years ago. Today it is working to complete various agreements in Vienna, Austria on voluntary guidelines.  It is also cooperating with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in Geneva, Switzerland that helps with agreements with regard to telecommunications frequency allotments and assignments, prevention of jamming, and interference and positioning of satellites.


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