Work of ARCUS on Enhancing Environmental Quality, Expanding Indigenous Peoples Leadership, While Protecting The Arctic [5.20.18]

Guests:

  • Segment ‘1’: Dr. Robert H. Rich, CAE, Executive Director, Arctic Research Consortium of the United Status (ARCUS), (In-Studio and Skype Back-Up)*, Theme: “Understanding the Changing Arctic – Research and Education Connections Enable Environmental Awareness, Resilience, Sustainable Development, and Planning”;
  • Show 1- 0-12:53
  • Segment ‘2’: Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, Senior Climate Scientist and Director of Climate Science, Climate & Energy Program, Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), (In-Studio), Theme: “Strengthening Scientific Analysis and Outreach for Sound U.S. Climate Policies, Especially for the Arctic, Making Climate Change Science Accessible to Diverse Audiences”
  • Show 2-15:0327:49
  • Segment ‘3’: Deanna Wheeler, Science Teacher & Arctic Circle Explorer, J.C. Parks Elementary School, Indian Head, MD”, (In-Studio), Theme: “Melding the Love of Learning and the Out-of-Doors so ‘No Child is Left Indoors’ in Hands-on Experiential Education”
  • Show 3-30:0542:56
  • Segment ‘4: Kaare Ray Sikuaq Erickson, North Slope Science Liaison, Ukpeagvik Inupiaq Corporation (UIC) Science, (By Skype)*, Theme: “Challenges of Arctic Communities While Identifying Traditional, Creative, Realistic, and Effective Ways to Alleviate or Solve These Issues While Reducing Climate Change Impacts
  • Show 4-45:04-end
Show 1Dr. Robert H. Rich, CAE, Executive Director, Arctic Research Consortium of the United Status (ARCUS) Show 2Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, Senior Climate Scientist and Director of Climate Science, Climate & Energy Program, Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS)
Show 3Deanna Wheeler, Science Teacher & Arctic Circle Explorer, J.C. Parks Elementary School, Indian Head, MD Show 4Kaare Ray Sikuaq Erickson, North Slope Science Liaison, Ukpeagvik Inupiaq Corporation (UIC) Science

Program Summary:

The EmeraldPlanet weekly television programs are broadcast and distributed via Channel 10 TV in Fairfax, Virginia USA. The EmeraldPlanet TV programs are available to view on our website, YouTube, UStream TV, and social media around the world. The Emerald Trek and companion The Emerald Mini-Treks are identifying the 1,000 “best practices” on location from the 143 nations, 750 cities, and 50,000 communities by Internet TV, local television stations, main stream media outlets, YouTube, Facebook, The EmeraldPlanet Meetup, Twitter, among other social media networks, and all manner of print media.

The EmeraldPlanet TV is broadcasting weekly a number of the “best practices which are identified through collaboration with:  major non-governmental organizations (NGOs); United Nations, universities and colleges; research institutes; government ministries and agencies; Embassies; banking and micro-lending organizations; Chambers of Commerce; World Trade Centers, international bodies such as The World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Inter-American Development Bank, African Development Bank Group, Asian Development Bank, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization), citizens groups; multimedia organizations; among others by utilizing the most advanced broadcasting hardware and software along with an outstanding television Production Crew to reach an ever expanding global audience. The Emerald Trek is focused upon linking principals identified among the 1,000 ‘best practices’ in the 143 nations being visited through this world-wide movement. The Emerald Trek is encompassing over 300,000 miles, visiting 750 major cities, and 50,000 suburban and rural communities in the identified nations.

Our featured guests are:

  • Show ‘1’: Dr. Robert H. Rich, CAE, Executive Director, Arctic Research Consortium of the United Status (ARCUS), (In-Studio and Skype Back-Up)*, Theme: “Understanding the Changing Arctic – Research and Education Connections Enable Environmental Awareness, Resilience, Sustainable Development, and Planning”
  • Show ‘2’:  Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, Senior Climate Scientist and Director of Climate Science, Climate & Energy Program, Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), (In-Studio), Theme: “Strengthening Scientific Analysis and Outreach for Sound U.S. Climate Policies, Especially for the Arctic, Making Climate Change Science Accessible to Diverse Audiences”
  • Show ‘3’: Deanna Wheeler, Science Teacher & Arctic Circle Explorer, J.C. Parks Elementary School, Indian Head, MD”, (In-Studio), Theme: “Melding the Love of Learning and the Out-of-Doors so ‘No Child is Left Indoors’ in Hands-on Experiential Education”
  • Show ‘4’: Kaare Ray Sikuaq Erickson, North Slope Science Liaison, Ukpeagvik Inupiaq Corporation (UIC) Science, (By Skype)*, Theme: “Challenges of Arctic Communities While Identifying Traditional, Creative, Realistic, and Effective Ways to Alleviate or Solve These Issues While Reducing Climate Change Impacts”

Program Overview:

The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) has been connecting Arctic research since 1988. Because of its regional nature, Arctic research often cuts across multiple disciplines, organizations, nations, and populations. ARCUS provides intangible infrastructure to support the formation and enhancement of connections across these boundaries, working toward a more holistic understanding of the Arctic. Supported by government agencies, foundations, and others who share a desire to advance Arctic knowledge, ARCUS maintains a portfolio of programs to communicate, educate, coordinate, and collaborate to advance Arctic understanding.

ARCUS members advance understanding of the Arctic through science, technology, Indigenous knowledge, and education. Members promote the application of this knowledge to Arctic and global challenges, and address questions that require the collaborative skills and resources of scientists, engineers, educators, Indigenous knowledge holders, and others. ARCUS works closely with other organizations with Arctic interests, such as the U.S. Arctic Research Commission (USARC), the Polar Research Board (PRB), the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), the Arctic Institute of North America (AINA), the European Polar Board, the Arctic Council and its scientific working groups, the Association for Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS), and Polar Educators International (PEI).

ARCUS is a U.S. 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation that serves the Arctic research community. Membership is open to academic, research, government, Indigenous, and corporate organizations, as well as individuals who want to advance Arctic research. Representatives of member organizations constitute the Council of ARCUS and elect the Board of Directors. Members receive preferential opportunities to lead, support, and participate in ARCUS activities.

Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) was founded in 1969 by scientists and students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. That year, the Vietnam War was at its height and Cleveland’s heavily polluted Cuyahoga River had caught fire. Appalled at how the U.S. government was misusing science, the UCS founders drafted a statement calling for scientific research to be directed away from military technologies and toward solving pressing environmental and social problems.

UCS remains true to that founding vision. Throughout its history, UCS has followed the example set by the scientific community: Share information; Seek the truth, and Let scientific findings guide the conclusions. It has proven to be a powerful formula!

By mobilizing scientists and combining their voices with those of advocates, educators, business people, and other concerned citizens, UCS has built a reputation for fairness and accuracy and amassed an impressive history of accomplishments.
For nearly half a century, the Union of Concerned Scientists has combined the knowledge and influence of the scientific community with the passion of concerned citizens to build a healthy planet and a safer world.

The vision of J.C. Parks Elementary School is to create the best environment where all students experience academic success, develop personal responsibility, and achieve career readiness for the 21st century. The Parks pride Pledge includes be:

Responsible by being responsible for your actions, your voice, and your own learning; Respectful:by showing respect to yourself, adults, your peers; and Ready to learn making sure you are ready to learn at all times.

Joseph Christopher (J.C.) Parks was responsible for securing the funding needed to build J.C. Parks Elementary School. After a congressional committee tabled discussions to give the county money for a new elementary school, Parks went to Washington, D.C., and convinced the committee to award him the funds to build the school. Parks was born in Lexington, Ky. He studied education at the Hampton Institute, Penn State University, Morgan State College and Catholic University. In 1917, Parks came to Maryland where he worked as a principal at Centreville High School.

After briefly serving in the U.S. Army during World War I, Parks began working as the supervisor of colored schools for Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) in 1919. During his career with CCPS, Parks was instrumental in drafting plans and securing funds for several elementary schools and the county’s first and second high schools – Pomonkey and Bel Alton. Parks also worked with P.D. Brown to establish the first public library in the county. Additionally, Parks served as executive secretary to the Maryland State Teachers Association and worked toward obtaining equal salaries for teachers statewide. Parks retired from CCPS in 1961.

Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation (UIC) is one of Alaska’s largest companies and is headquartered in Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost point in America. As an Alaska Native Corporation, UIC provides social and economic resources to over 2,900 Iñupiat shareholders and their descendants. UIC’s core business practice commitments are: Safety; Quality; Business Ethics; Shareholder Development; and Value.

The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) was passed in 1971, and gave Alaska Natives as a group US$944 million and title to forty-four [44] million acres of land in exchange for our claims to 340 million acres of traditional lands, including the oil-rich area of Prudhoe Bay. During the development of ANCSA, its leaders were creative and resourceful, like their ancestors had been. When UIC was established, Barrow was still very much a subsistence-oriented community. UIC’s very rich history, “Mission”, “Vision”, and “Values, plus an expanded history can be found at: https://uicalaska.com/about-uic/.


Thank you Happy, Production Crew, Program Team, and volunteers for your outstanding commitment, dedication, and goodwill as we create The EmeraldPlanet… 
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