WHOLives with Water As Life: Meeting the Needs of One Billion People with Water, Health, & Opportunities One Well at a Time [8.26.18]

Guests:

  • Segment ‘1’: John Renouard, Founder & Director, Water, Health, & Opportunity Lives (WHOLives), (By Skype)*, Theme: “Beating the Baseline so Communities and Families Win the Race for Life with Clean Drinking Water”,
  • Show 1-0:0-12:57
  • Segment ‘2’: Dr. Christopher (Chris) A. Mattson, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, (By-Skype)*, Theme: “Advanced Engineering Answering the Call for Practical Solutions Bringing Pure Drinking Water to Challenged Communities”
  • Show 2-15:0927:50
  • Segment ‘3’ Daniel (Danny) O. Smith and Victoria Baird, Design Exploration Group Assistants, Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, (By Skype)*, Theme: “Harnessing the Ingenuity of Young Engineers Creating Practical Solutions for Today’s Water Challenges”
  • Show 3-30:0742:56
  • Segment ‘4’: Christopher (Chris) Tibbitts, Director of Global Development, Water, Health, & Opportunity Lives (WHOLives) & The Village Drill, (In-Studio and Skype Back-Up)* “Special Guest”, Theme: “Appropriate Technology + Low Investment + High Impact = Increased Water, Better Health, and Greater Community Opportunities with The Village Drill”.
  • Show 4-45:06-end
Show 1 John Renouard, Founder & Director, Water, Health, & Opportunity Lives (WHOLives) Show 2Dr. Christopher (Chris) A. Mattson, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University
Show 3Daniel (Danny) O. Smith and Victoria Baird, Design Exploration Group Assistants, Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University Show 4Christopher (Chris) Tibbitts, Director of Global Development, Water, Health, & Opportunity Lives (WHOLives) & The Village Drill

Program Summary:

The EmeraldPlanet weekly television programs are broadcast and distributed via Channel 10 TV in Fairfax, Virginia USA. The EmeraldPlanet TV programs are available to view on our website, YouTube, UStream TV, and social media around the world. The Emerald Trek and companion The Emerald Mini-Treks are identifying the 1,000 “best practices” on location from the 143 nations, 750 cities, and 50,000 communities by Internet TV, local television stations, main stream media outlets, YouTube, Facebook, The EmeraldPlanet Meetup, Twitter, among other social media networks, and all manner of print media.

The EmeraldPlanet TV is broadcasting weekly a number of the “best practices which are identified through collaboration with:  major non-governmental organizations (NGOs); United Nations, universities and colleges; research institutes; government ministries and agencies; Embassies; banking and micro-lending organizations; Chambers of Commerce; World Trade Centers, international bodies such as The World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Inter-American Development Bank, African Development Bank Group, Asian Development Bank, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization), citizens groups; multimedia organizations; among others by utilizing the most advanced broadcasting hardware and software along with an outstanding television Production Crew to reach an ever expanding global audience. The Emerald Trek is focused upon linking principals identified among the 1,000 ‘best practices’ in the 143 nations being visited through this world-wide movement. The Emerald Trek is encompassing over 300,000 miles, visiting 750 major cities, and 50,000 suburban and rural communities in the identified nations.

Our featured guests are:

  • Show ‘1’: John Renouard, Founder & Director, Water, Health, & Opportunity Lives (WHOLives), (By Skype)*, Theme: “Beating the Baseline so Communities and Families Win the Race for Life with Clean Drinking Water”
    • Video: BASELINE: 30 Meters Between Life and Death (Between 7:08 – 8:47 minutes: https://vimeo.com/269385935)
  • Show ‘2’: Dr. Christopher (Chris) A. Mattson, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, (By-Skype)*, Theme: “Advanced Engineering Answering the Call for Practical Solutions Bringing Pure Drinking Water to Challenged Communities”
    • Video: The Village Drill Brings Water to Remote Villages (Between 0:00 – 1:23 minutes: https://vimeo.com/277191725?from=outro-embed)
  • Show ‘3’: Daniel (Danny) O. Smith and Victoria Baird, Design Exploration Group Assistants, Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, (By Skype)*, Theme: “Harnessing the Ingenuity of Young Engineers Creating Practical Solutions for Today’s Water Challenges”
    • Video: BYU Test Drilling in Tanzania (Between 1:24 – 3:14 minutes: https://vimeo.com/277191725?from=outro-embed)
  • Show ‘4’: Christopher (Chris) Tibbitts, Director of Global Development, Water, Health, & Opportunity Lives (WHOLives) & The Village Drill, (In-Studio and Skype Back-Up)* “Special Guest”, Theme: “Appropriate Technology + Low Investment + High Impact = Increased Water, Better Health, and Greater Community Opportunities with The Village Drill”
    • Video: Quick Visual of Current Hand Drilling Water Methods (Between 0:04 – 1:11 minutes: https://villagedrill.com/the-drill/compare/)

Program Overview:

The WHO of WHOLives, stands for WATER, HEALTH and OPPORTUNITY. It is by solving these three issues that an individual, community, or nation can escape the enslaving power of poverty. There are no examples of villages, communities, or countries that have defeated poverty without first solving their clean water issues. Statistics from the United Nations Development Programmer (UNDP) report 3.4 million people die every year as a result of scarce and contaminated water. Yet, the developing world is littered with broken pumps and contaminated wells installed by well-meaning organizations and individuals. Self-reliance and sustainability disappear when wells are given away with more dependency is actually created.

The mission of WHOLives, an award-winning, world-wide non-profit organization, is to eradicate scarce and contaminated water issues by providing sustainable water, health, and economic opportunities to people throughout the developing world. John Renouard, the Founder and Director of WHOLives, quickly learned that the answer to keeping wells operational is found in the phrase, “A well that is making money gets fixed the day it breaks”. Because we encourage local ownership and economic viability with each installed water system, wells are locally maintained in perpetuity.

This is also true for a drill team placing the wells. The ability to generate constant income is the key to creating a sustainable and profitable drilling business. The solution begins with the revolutionary, human powered Village Drill. The Village Drill can drill in 75% more places for 75% less money than a traditional diesel powered drill rig, allowing communities to afford a well without help from an NGO or their government. This simple change has enabled a sustainable model which again, creates opportunity, rather than dependency.

WHOLives is serving people in developing nations across the globe. Currently there are eighty-five [85] drill teams in thirty-six [36] countries. Collectively WHOLives, with The Village Drill, has drilled over 3,000 wells in the past three and one-half [3 and 1/2] years. Simply stated by John Renouard, “There is so much more to be done” to bring fresh, clean, and pure water to literally one-half of the world’s population.

“The belief that every human being deserves access to clean water is the fuel that keeps us innovating,” observes John Renouard, founder of the Village Drill systems. In 2010, after traveling to East Africa and seeing so many women and children enslaved in the chore of fetching dirty water, John conceptualized The Village Drill in partnership with a group of dedicated engineering Capstone students at Brigham Young University (BYU).

In seven [7] months these ingenious and innovative Mechanical Engineering students created and manufactured the first Village Drill. With “Engineered to Last” as the motto, The Village Drill was designed with simplicity, transportability, and durability as the guiding principles. The ability to drill up to 300 feet (91.44 meters) through almost any substrata, makes The Village Drill the most effective tool in the fight to eliminate scarce and contaminated water that kills over 3.4 million people every year.

The Village Drill can drill in 75% more places and for 75% less cost than a traditional diesel engine drill rig. This allows local villages and communities to afford a well without waiting decades for help from an NGO or their government. This simple change has enabled a sustainable drilling model, which creates opportunity rather than dependency. Generating constant, local income without aid is the key to creating self-reliance and sustainability. The Village Drill is the only tool with price point that allows local ownership and is also strong enough to enable a profitable drilling business. This combination is what has made The Village Drill the global leader in not only borehole drilling technology, but in poverty eradication as well.

Dr. Christopher Mattson, Professor of Engineering at Brigham Young University and Director of the Capstone Project in Mechanical Engineering that gave life to the first Village Drill, announced that “over the past three and one-half years, The Village Drill has sourced enough water to give everyone on the planet 2-liters of water, and a drink on the way out.” That’s 1.7 billion liters of water! The solution begins with the revolutionary, human powered Village Drill.

The Brigham Young University Department of Mechanical Engineering consists of 28 faculty members, 12 full-time staff, over 1,200 undergraduate students, and 130 graduate students. It is a collaborative community where all faculty, staff, and students strive for excellence in teaching, learning, and discovery. Faculty and students work together to learn the fundamental principles of mechanical engineering through classroom and laboratory settings. They also work together to conduct leading research where the aim is to discover new knowledge and processes and to design new devices, processes, and products which will lead to improvements in the modern world. Mechanical engineers learn how to solve real world problems that involve forces and dynamical motion, materials, strengths, common manufacturing methods, design principles, computer design tools, fluid physics, thermodynamics, and the transfer of heat, the use of instrumentation to conduct experiments, and how to use computational tools to solve complex problems.

Faculty members goals are to help mechanical engineering students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to become truly influential engineers in their chosen areas of expertise. Influential engineers impact the world in a variety of ways. To maximize their potential to be influential engineers, students must come to recognize their strengths and apply them in ways that lead to a positive impact on people, problems, and the profession. Since each student is unique, defining influence is highly personal and will typically change over time as new opportunities arise and new skills are developed. While some may affect large numbers of people in obvious, publicly recognized ways, others will quietly lead and inspire those within their sphere of influence in less recognized ways. Regardless of where students find themselves having the most impact, they will become influential engineers as they develop technical excellence, leadership, communication skills, character, and a commitment to lifelong learning and service.

Mechanical engineering is a very broad subject that deals with essentially anything that moves, including the human body, machines that range from simple to complex systems, and devices with embedded sensors and actuators. It is the broadest of the engineering disciplines and mechanical engineers work in many different industries. Some of these include aerospace, automotive, biomedical, energy systems, product design and development, and manufacturing, although this list is only a subset of areas where mechanical engineers work. Nearly every product that is developed and humans interact with in any manner has had a mechanical engineer involved at some stage in the design and/or production process.


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